Author Topic: The way I look at scales!  (Read 1494 times)

danihrabin

  • Con-Fuzed
  • *
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
    • Marbin
The way I look at scales!
« on: September 19, 2013, 05:34:25 PM »

The way I look at it, there are only 7 scales in music!
The definition of a scale is a group of notes that doesn't have 2 consecutive half steps and no interval larger than a minor third!

with definition this in mind there are only 7 scales in existence:

4diatonic
major 1234567 (7modes)
melodic minor 12b34567 (7modes)
harmonic minor 12b345b67 (7modes)
harmonic major 12345b67 (7modes)

3 symmetrical
diminished 12b34b5b6bb77 (2modes)
whole tone 123#4#5b7 (1mode)
augmented 1#235b67 (2 modes)

This definition of scales gives you every possible combination of 4 part chords with 3 available tensions and basically gives you the complete outlook that is necessary to play through any harmonic possibility.
Dani Rabin (guitarist for Marbin)
www.youtube.com/marbinmusic
www.marbinmusic.com

rapidfirerob

  • Global Moderator
  • Fuze-Master
  • *****
  • Posts: 1345
    • View Profile
    • Idlewild West
Re: The way I look at scales!
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2013, 09:50:08 PM »
Cool, thanks a lot.

millions

  • Founding Member
  • Fuze-O-Phile
  • *****
  • Posts: 294
    • View Profile
Re: The way I look at scales!
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2013, 11:47:12 AM »
Yes, you are definitely on to something here! The criterion of "a group of notes that doesn't have 2 consecutive half steps and no interval larger than a minor third" is very important. I believe Holdsworth used this as his criteria for discarding the possibilities which did not meet this criteria. 
"In Spring! In the creation of art, it must be as it is in Spring!" -Arnold Schoenberg
"The trouble with New Age music is that there's no evil in it."-Brian Eno

millions

  • Founding Member
  • Fuze-O-Phile
  • *****
  • Posts: 294
    • View Profile
Re: The way I look at scales!
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2013, 11:49:55 AM »
Quote:
"I started out using a fixed number, like the number 1, because of the transposing nature of stringed instruments, you can transpose real easy, which you can't do on other instruments. So I figured that if I started with, say, 5-note scales, that I could just permutate them all, like 1 through 5, then 12346, 12347, etc. through to 12."
"Then, I'd do the same with 6-note, 7-note, 8-note, and 9 notes. Then, I catalogued them, filed them away, and threw away all the ones that had more than four semitones in a row, in a straight row. And I just analyzed them, looked at them, until I could see chords within them."
"And then I realized that the way I think about chords is they're just parts of the scale that are played simultaneously; and as the chord changes go by, I don't so much think about a static chord voicing, staying, at all, changing; I just feel like the whole, the notes on the neck change. And I guess for me, the only thing that makes one scale different from another, is not the starting note, it's the separation of the intervals. So that's basically how I think of scales."
"In Spring! In the creation of art, it must be as it is in Spring!" -Arnold Schoenberg
"The trouble with New Age music is that there's no evil in it."-Brian Eno